Line of Duty Death Survivors: What Do They Need to Cope With Their Grief?

by Peggy Sweeney

Let us not forget the brave men and women who sacrificed their lives doing their duty to protect and serve. We remember law enforcement and correctional officers, firefighters, and emergency medical personnel.

Most people half-heartedly acknowledge or completely ignore the news item while searching for more significant information relating to their personal lives; a baseball score, stock market figures, want ads, or horoscopes.

Civilians cannot relate to this type of tragedy nor can they comprehend the depth of grief and gut-wrenching pain that every member of the department is feeling as a result of this tragic death. Their lives will not be changed by this tragedy. Unfortunately, this is not true for the family and co-workers of this fallen hero. Life as they knew it will never be the same again. Continue reading

When a Call Becomes All Too Personal (your child’s death)

by Tim Trickey
Captain, AEMCA
Advanced Emergency Medical Care Attendant [Paramedic]

Editor’s Note: Tim wrote this article in 2014 to help emergency responders cope with tragic calls, but most importantly, to share how he copes with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Sadly, Tim died on December 17, 2017. He leaves his wife and son to mourn his loss, as well as his crew and those whose lives he touched. Rest in peace, my friend.


I was asked by a very dear friend that has helped me through some very difficult years, to tell you about my daughter, Natasha.

I am a Paramedic in Ontario, Canada. Some of you may have been in the Kingston area where I am still working. Ten years ago, I was the supervisor of a small, rural volunteer ambulance service that, at the time, had a call volume of about 500 calls per year. Like most, we hope we never have to respond to family emergencies. But like all small communities, it is usually someone you know, or in my case, family. Continue reading